Thursday, August 16, 2018

Guest Blog Post: Chemical Problem Solving

Are you considering taking General Chemistry (CHEM BC2001) this fall? Are you wondering about your level of preparation? 

You may want to consider enrolling in CHEM BC1003, Chemical Problem Solving. This is a one-credit course that meets weekly to reinforce fundamental chemical concepts and approaches to analytical problem solving. Particular emphasis is placed on the mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills essential for success in CHEM BC2001, General Chemistry. Class will be led in a workshop style and enrollment will be no more than 15 students per section. The course will be offered at the following times this Fall:

Section 01: Tuesdays, 8:40 AM – 9:55 AM
Section 02: Tuesdays, 6:10 PM – 7:25 PM
Section 03: Thursdays, 8:40 AM – 9:55 AM
Section 04: Thursdays, 6:10 PM – 7:25 PM

If you are interested in this course, please complete this form! The form asks for some general information regarding your high school experience and also includes ten analytical problems. The questions do not require prior knowledge of chemistry. Your responses will help us provide you with the best guidance regarding your chemical coursework. We anticipate the form to take about 30 minutes to complete, but you can take as long as you need. The use of a calculator or any outside resource is not permitted. The form must be submitted by Friday, August 31st, to be considered for enrollment in Chemical Problem Solving.

Please note the following:
Students enrolled in Chemical Problem Solving (CHEM BC1003) must also be enrolled in General Chemistry (CHEM BC2001).
Chemical Problem Solving is not an appropriate course for students who have completed AP or IB Chemistry (or the equivalent).

Email course instructors Prof. Dina Merrer (dmerrer@barnard.edu) or Prof. Marisa Buzzeo (mbuzzeo@barnard.edu) with any questions.

We look forward to seeing you on campus!



Tuesday, August 14, 2018

FAQ: Student Employment


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Hi there!

So one common source of sheer mystification I had coming in to my first year (and second. And third) was how I was going to find a job or make money to support myself throughout the year! I know that many you must have similar concerns about working while at Barnard, so the Office of the First-Year Dean has decided to team up with Student Employment to shed a little light on campus resources and hopefully answer some of your questions in this FAQ!

Q: Should I work during college? Wouldn’t it be more useful to just focus on my studies? 
A: IMO, yes. I have had a job every semester that I have attended Barnard. Because, lets face it, when Biggie said "Mo money mo problems", he wasn't referring to the life of a college student. The price of books, homework codes (sometimes you have to pay for class codes which give you access to course materials like homework and practice problems/exams), food, refilling your metrocard, and laundry, on top of many other things and having a social life contributed to it being dang near impossible for me to go without a steady income. NYC is very expensive, and so is living away from your parents! (Side note: Dont stress too much about books for class, we'll cover to save money on textbooks in an upcoming post!)

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In addition to providing me with money during the year, working while in college also gives me a lot of great experience to put on my resume for after I graduate, and that really is the end goal here. You may think that working would be too much of a distraction while trying to focus on classes, but studies show that students who work part time have slightly higher GPAs than their unemployed counterparts, in addition to helping you be more structured and focused! If you still have some reservations and can afford to wait, take a semester or two to see what college life is like before getting one!

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Q: Okay all this delivery is quickly depleting my money. But how do I even find a job? 
A: There are many resources out there, like LinkedIn and Indeed, who are great, but I would HIGHLY recommend using Handshake and BarnardWorks as it is specifically for students here, and includes jobs that will be more geared towards providing employable skills and flexible hours for students. On BarnardWorks, they have a range of listings including: On Campus jobs, Off Campus jobs, Paid and Unpaid Internships, and many others! You can also look at Handshake for many listings for internships and off campus work! Plus, both sites save a lot of your details so that you don't have to keep inputting them, because that gets VERY tiresome after like the third job. (Side note: If BarnardWorks won’t allow you to sign-on, that that means that you need to get your social security number to the Barnard College Registrar’s Office asap, so get on that and then you can get to job hunting!)

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Q: What if I want to work, but my schedule is so crazy that I don't think that I’ll have time for a traditional work schedule? 
A: An amazing opportunity for us is the Barnard Bartending and the Barnard Babysitting Agencies! They are both client based jobs, so you can choose to work whenever you want to! And it is especially useful that many jobs are weekend/evenings/nights, on a one-time basis, pay pretty well (bartending is $20/hr minimum, babysitting $15/hr minimum), and its very beneficial to our lifestyles. Babysitting is super quick and easy to sign-up for, as you only need to print, sign, and return the Barnard Babysitting Rules Acknowledgement Form to studentemployment@barnard.edu. Bartending is a bit more involved, as you need to attend training (which costs $25) and pass the bartending exam, practicals and TIPS training in order to be eligible.
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Q: I got my financial aid packet back and they said I was eligible for Federal Work Study, but I have no clue what that is or where to find a work study job! 
A: Federal Work Study (FWS) and Barnard College Jobs (BCJ) are both types of aid that allow you to work in locations on campus like at sports games as attendants or concessions, at libraries, in academic departments, student services departments, and many others. With FWS, you are also able to work at Columbia, off campus, or in community service jobs. With BCJ you can work on the Barnard College Campus only. You can find these jobs on BarnardWorks!



Q: What's a resume/cover letter, and how do I even begin writing one?? 
A: You're in luck! Beyond Barnard has info on resumes, cover letters, offers tips on conducting a job search, and many more valuable resources! Starting in the fall, they will also have a dedicated staff of Peer Career Advisers that you can contact about resume and cover letter advice and rewriting, so be on the lookout for that.

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Q: My resume is looking like I'm only going to need a postcard at most. Where can I find volunteer positions to help add to it? 
A:  Beyond Barnard offers many different civic engagement opportunities throughout the city! Plans for the 2018-2019 academic year include, but are not limited to, serving with community partners in the Morningside Heights and Harlem areas. Civic engagement at Barnard includes service, attendance at panel discussions hosted by community leaders, civic engagement site visits, campus-wide days of service, and much more! If you want to engage with your new community, the Beyond Barnard staff can help you explore a broad range of volunteer opportunities in a variety of fields.

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Student Job Placement:

So this year, Beyond Barnard has started an new initiative of placing eligible FWS and BCJ students in jobs! If you qualify for this aid and have completed all required financial aid paperwork, you should have received an email with a questionnaire to fill out so that you can be considered for job placement in a job on-campus. As many of you as possible will be placed in entry level, office jobs in various locations around Barnard, with you hearing back on or before the first two weeks of classes. These placements will be on-going, so if you don’t hear back within that time frame, don’t sweat! This program massively minimizes the effort you need to do on your part time find a job, and like many new programs there will need to be some on and off campus adjustment, so have a little patience while they work through these new processes all across campus for you!



 I can’t cover all of the amazing work that Beyond Barnard does, so here’s Cindy Meekins of Beyond Barnard to give you a bit more guidance:
Beyond Barnard is a new unit that is comprised of career development, student employment, professional schools support, fellowships, internships, externships, civic engagement and unpaid internship funding opportunities, which is staffed with a team of 19 professionals, who are here to help you create your own pathways to success. We engage with campus and community partners, employers, and for-profit and non-profit companies, agencies and organizations, to provide access for you to explore your interests and to help you gain valuable skills. Our aim is to help you with your entire career exploration goals, which include creating a new resume and getting a part-time job, to affording you internship and externship opportunities, to helping you determine and create your own pathway to success beyond the gates of Barnard. 

I hope this helped! If you need more assistance or want to talk to someone, you can always contact me at first-year@barnard.edu or Cindy Meekins, Director for Experiential Education, Zena Jones, Coordinator for Internships, and Bruce Ross, Assistant to the Director, in Beyond Barnard are be more than happy to hear from you! They can be reached at 212.854.2033 or at studentemployment@barnard.edu.

Friday, August 10, 2018

NSOP Language Placement Test Information



Now that NSOP is just around the corner, it’s time to start thinking about what, if any, language placement tests you’d like to take. We’ve gathered the information for some of the most highly requested language placement tests from y’all and listed all the details you need to know down below.

The Student Side: Course Planning and Advisor Meetings

During the Summer Registration periods, you registered for a First-Year Writing or First-Year Seminar and maybe a P.E. class. Now it’s time to craft the rest of your schedule. You know how to find, add, and register for courses on your schedule, but now what? How the heck do you pick other classes? When do you meet with an adviser? What if you don’t know what you want to major in? How many classes do you pick?




Image of me picking classes as a first-year, colorized, 2016.


Tuesday, August 7, 2018

The Student Side: Move-In, Dorm Decorations, and What to Bring to College

Room assignments have been posted and we’re sure many of y’all have already begun to plan your dorm decorations and what you’ll be bringing to college. It really is super exciting to plan your dorm room.



We’ve moved in and decorated dorm rooms a few times now, and we’re here to impart some knowledge about the move-in process, dorm room decorating, and what to bring to college.

Monday, August 6, 2018

The Student Side: Be Like State Farm (AKA Be a Good Neighbor)

Beyond your room, you’ll also be living on a floor with other people. You’ll share bathrooms, a floor lounge, and a laundry room with your floor mates. Let’s talk about proper etiquette and how to be respectful of these shared spaces:

The Student Side: Being a Good Roommate

In college, you’ll spend a lot of time in the dorms. It doesn’t matter if you live on campus or not, you’ll most likely be hanging out friends, studying, and going to events in the dorm buildings. So let’s talk about how to be the friendly roommate, floor mate, and neighbor that Mr. Rogers always wanted you to be.




(more after the break)

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Warning: Email Scams, Spam, "Phishing," and Viruses

Several students have reported receiving an email that appears to contain a job offer.  Even if it appears to come from a friend of yours, be skeptical of any such emails!

Some tips to avoid accidentally opening and sharing malicious or fraudulent emails:


Not expecting an attachment? Don't open it -- ask first! Curiosity is understandable but risky.


Already opened it?  Contact Student Computing ASAP for advice and assistance.


Got something that seems too good to be true (job offer, free money, etc.)?  It probably is.

Someone asking you something that seems weird (password, bank account, social security number)?  Be wary of phishing emails that ask you for personal information. Remember that neither Barnard nor Columbia (nor, for that matter, any reputable business or organization) will ever ask you to provide your login, password or Social Security Number in an email. DO NOT REPLY to any mail that does ask for such personal information. If you have questions about any email that you receive which asks for such information, please email Student Computing.

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Application Due Tomorrow: Research Apprenticeship Seminar


Applications for the Research Apprenticeship Seminar are due TOMORROW, 9/25, by 9:00 AM Eastern Time. Don't miss your chance to be in this exciting first-year only seminar!


To find out more info on the course and get some thoughts on the course from a student who took the course, click here. 

If you're interested in applying for the Research Apprenticeship Seminar here's how to do it:
1.  Log into myBarnard/gBear
2.  Click this link for the Google Form:  https://goo.gl/forms/3qLgfSgEVSokeQY93
3.  Fill out the form, which will ask you for your name and a brief statement of interest (250 words maximum), explaining why you want to take this class and why you think you would be a good candidate for it. The deadline to submit this form is 9 a.m. on Wednesday, July 25.

Friday, July 20, 2018

Summer Registration Closes TODAY

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Summer registration closes today at 4:30 PM Eastern Time! Please make sure that you have registered for your First-Year Experience Courses: First-Year Writing, First-Year Seminar and P.E.

A few quick reminders and announcements about summer registration:
  • All P.E. classes are currently full. If you did not register for a P.E. course, you can take a dance course in the fall, take a dance course or P.E. course in the spring, or play a varsity sport in order to fulfill the P.E. requirement.
  • You'll be able to register for a dance course starting on August 31st, along with all other non-FYE courses
  • While there will be a second Summer Registration week in August for last minute registration, it's best if you register for your First-Year Writing/Seminar course today. After the August Summer Registration, your First-Year Writing/Seminar courses are fixed and cannot be changed or dropped from your schedule.
  • First-Year Writing, First-Year Seminar, and P.E. courses do not take waiting lists.
If you're having any problems registering, please call the Office of the Dean of Studies at 212-854-2024 or email first-year@barnard.edu


Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Guest Blog Post: Thoughts on the Research Apprenticeship Seminar from Jenna Bergmann, '18




There's some exciting additional information about the Research Apprenticeship Seminar! This year, Beyond Barnard is partnering with the class to match each student in the course with a Barnard alumnae to visit and talk with about a career in science and research. Additionally, Beyond Barnard will visit the class throughout the year to offer advising and internship information about careers in science.
Continue reading to learn thoughts on the Research Apprenticeship Seminar from Jenna Bergmann, '18: Personally, I had already done research in high school when I applied for RAS and was excited for the chance to talk about careers in research and working in Barnard labs. I was sure that I wanted to do research in college, but as a pre-med student, I didn't know whether I wanted research to be a part of my career beyond that. I loved the class days when we discussed different careers in science, talked about how to read scientific papers, and learning about the different paths you can take to get there, as well as receiving advice on how to reach out to potential research mentors. Shadowing in Barnard labs was perhaps the most influential experience of the course for me, as I ended up doing research in both of the labs that I shadowed in. It was through working with those mentors that I came to my decision to pursue an MD/PhD and continue with research as a part of my career.


Whenever prospective students ask me about research opportunities for first-years, I am so excited for a chance to talk about the Research Apprenticeship Seminar (RAS). While it's not unheard of for first-years to begin working in labs, RAS is a great chance to get their feet wet in what it means to do research in college and beyond.
Other members of my class, however, really enjoyed the class even if they didn't go on to pursue science as a career or even as a major. Interest in scientific research does not have to mean a career in research, and my RAS class was enriched by Barnard first-years who went on to pursue arts and humanities but still benefited from the class. Discussing science in the news and having debates on topics ranging from vaccination to genome editing allows first-years enrolled in intro science classes to put what their learning in a more relatable context and to understand how scientific research plays a role in society. We also did presentations on scientists of our choosing and on science in the news, allowing me to work on my presentation skills in college in a low-pressure environment. The Research Apprenticeship Seminar gave me a network of fellow Barnard students who were interested in learning about science on several different levels. It broadened my interest in the field of research and the role of science in society, it gave me practical skills for research and other classes, and it gave me the confidence I needed to continue my pursuit of research at Barnard and beyond.

Jenna graduated this past spring with a double major in biology and classics. She currently works as a research technician at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City.

If you're interested in applying for the Research Apprenticeship Seminar:
1.  Log into myBarnard/gBear
2.  Click this link for the Google Form:  https://goo.gl/forms/3qLgfSgEVSokeQY93
3.  Fill out the form, which will ask you for your name and a brief statement of interest (250 words maximum), explaining why you want to take this class and why you think you would be a good candidate for it. The deadline to submit this form is 9 a.m. on Wednesday, July 25.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

FY Writing or FY Seminars full? Try again later today, or tomorrow

Students who may have double-registered for FYS/FYW classes are now dropping extra sections as directed.  Some may be switching among sections their preferences may have changed overnight.

This means that more space is becoming available in these classes, so please check again later today or tomorrow if you weren't able to get into a FYW/FYS class during your registration time yesterday.  

Still can't find one?  Call the First-Year Dean's Office at 212-854-2024.

Monday, July 16, 2018

IMPORTANT: Please drop "extra" sections of FY Seminar or FY Writing ASAP



As a reminder, students may not register for more than one section of FY Seminar or FY Writing. There is simply not enough space to allow this, and it harms your fellow students by making them unable to register for a required course.  

If you are registered for more than one FY Seminar or FY Writing course, please drop all but one as soon as registration reopens at 9:30 a.m. Eastern Time Tuesday morning.  

If you are trying to drop an extra FYS or FYW class and receive an error message, please contact the Registrar ASAP at 212-854-2011.

If you are still registered for multiple sections of FY Seminar or FY Writing at 12 noon on Tuesday, July 17, the registrar will arbitrarily drop all but one from your schedule -- take care of this yourself ASAP if you want to have a choice in this matter.  

Registration Notes: GREEN is GOOD




Several of you have asked how to tell if you have successfully registered:

For First-Year Experience (FY Writing, FY Seminar, Barnard-taught PE) Courses:

If a class appears on your schedule or List of Courses in GREEN, then you have successfully registered for it.





This is true even if it says "This section is full."  Do NOT drop a green section due to concerns about it being full. If the course is GREEN, then you are among the students that is making this class full.  




If a First-Year Experience course that you have attempted to add appears on your schedule or list of courses in RED with a red border on your schedule AND says it is full on your list of courses:




Then this class is full and cannot be added at this time. 
Barnard First-Year Experience Courses do not have waiting lists. If your preferred class is full, you should add another section or a different course instead, but you may check back later to see if space becomes available. 









For all other, non-FY-Experience Courses:
Remember: only FYE courses will be fully registered this week.  
All other courses will remain in the "planned" stage on your record until the Sept. 1-2 registration period for entering first-year students.  




Note:
 the info directly under the course number shows your personal status in the class.  The info under "Meeting Information" is about the class as a whole.  In the example pictured at left: you are planned, and the class has a waitlist.  




Registration Issues (UPDATE)

UPDATE: REGISTRATION IS NOW FIXED. If your registration appointment has passed, you'll be able to log on and register. Registration appointments will continue on as normal for the rest of the day.

We're aware that there's registration issues at the moment. These issues are affecting everyone so no one is able to register. We'll being posting updates here and on the Facebook group about what's going on and next-steps for registration.

Friday, July 13, 2018

Last Minute Registration Reminders



Here are some last minute registration reminders to help Summer Registration on Monday go as smooth as possible!


  • All registration times are listed in Eastern Time
  • You're only registering for a First-Year Writing/First-Year Seminar course on Monday (and a Barnard P.E. course if you want to take P.E. in the fall). You'll register for all other courses during NSOP.
  • If you're planning on taking dance as your P.E. course, you can't register for it until NSOP
  • The 15 credit "Full-Time Billing" course listed on your schedule is a tuition place-holder for billing purposes. Don't worry about it and don't remove it from your schedule!
  • Make sure you have courses planned on your schedule before you register for them!
If you have any problems on Monday during registration, CALL US at 212-854-2024. It's faster than emailing and we can help you quicker.

Teaching Thursday Advising Recap

Here’s a recap of the Teaching Thursday Advising Chat we had today with Professor Lisa Edstrom. For even more information, please check out the Education Program's website, you where you can find even more questions and answers along with additional information about coursework and opportunities. If you have any questions that aren't answered by the Department of Education's website or below, feel free to email us at first-year@barnard.edu or hit up the professor.

Are there any courses that are suggested for first-years to take in the first year?


I recommend taking Education Foundations, Math and the City, Science in the City, Arts & Humanities in the City, as well as Intro to Psychology (no lab required for education) if you are considering Urban Teaching. 


Other recommended courses for first-years and their information can be found here!



It is also recommended that you look at potential tracks to see what courses you need to take, this will help guide your schedule. 


Urban Teaching tracks: 

or the Education Studies track (for a minor or special concentration). 


If you choose to minor in Education Studies, do you start those classes sophomore year? If it is something you aren’t completely sure that you want to do, could you add it on in let’s say your sophomore year or so?

If you choose the Education Studies minor, you can start in the first or second year. 


With all of our minors and the Urban Studies concentration, we recommend Educational Foundations as the first course. It is offered both semesters, and is an ideal course for first years trying to get a sense of what they might want to do. We also encourage you to explore our offerings early on. Take one class in the first year or fall of your sophomore year. That way, you have more time to set up a schedule that really works for you. 

(The Educational Foundations course can fulfill one of the Modes of Thinking requirements -- either Thinking about Social Difference OR Thinking with Historical Perspective, so if you try it out for the possible minor and change your mind, it is still fulfilling a requirement! The "In the City" courses also satisfy Thinking Locally. They are also really fun courses, because you work with kids.)


Is there a way to find out more about the Education Program during the school year after we've taken a class or two? Is there a department meeting we can attend?


Yes. Each semester we hold both an open house and program planning sessions where you can sit down one-on-one with faculty members and map out your own program and get advising specific to you. We post all of our upcoming meetings on our department website. Faculty in the program are very open to meeting with students at any time during the semester. You can access their contact information on their faculty pages (also on the department website), and for some, links to make appointments. 




Do Barnard students need to take some classes at Columbia as well or can everything be done at Barnard?


Barnard's Education Program is a complete education program. We support students who are interested in certification all the way to the end. All coursework is offered through Barnard. 



You can find the complete course listings for the Education Department or the Psychology Department on the Columbia Course Catalog. 


What's Next Wednesday Advising Recap

Here’s a recap of our What’s Next Wednesday Chat with Dean Nikki Youngblood-Giles, Associate Dean for Beyond Barnard. Look here for answers to questions on the 3-2 program, law school, grad school, work study and jobs, and beyond. If you have any more questions, feel free to email us at first-year@barnard.edu.


Are there are any classes first years are recommended to take for the 3-2 Program with SEAS? The 3-2 Program has specific requirements. It’s suggested that you initially tackle your Barnard requirements, and add Physics as your lab science as most of the SEAS programs require Physics. The 3-2 Program requirements can be found here. The 3-2 Program course requirements and their Barnard equivalent courses can be found here. Please consider the Barnard equivalent instead of the CU courses listed. The Barnard courses are smaller, and you will have access to Barnard’s free tutoring program in these courses.

Do students going into the 3-2 program always major in a STEM field? No, you can major in any field you like at Barnard as long as you fulfill the required courses for your SEAS major. Click here to see the different SEAS majors and required courses for the 3-2 program.

Do 3-2 students take more credits per semester compared to other students?Yes, because all major requirements (except the senior thesis) and the 3-2 course requirements must be completed in 3 years, students will take more credits per semester. However, the program can also be done as a 4-2 program - 4 years at Barnard and 2 years at SEAS. The 4-2 program offers more flexibility. Another option is the Express Master’s Program. This would allow you to earn a Master's degree from SEAS with a simplified application process.

How many years is the Express Masters program?The Express Masters is 1.5 - 2 years.

Are students who are interested in the 3-2 program able to study abroad? It is often difficult to study abroad with the 3-2 program. However, the 4-2 or Express Master's would give you that option.

Is there any way we can connect to students in the Combined Plan Program or the MS Express Program to ask them about their experiences?Yes, of course! Send an email to BeyondBarnard@barnard.edu and we can connect you with students in the program.

Regarding the 3-2 Program with SEAS, what ways are there to explore engineering during one's time at Barnard in order to determine whether the combined plan would be a good choice for you?Students should visit us in Beyond Barnard. We can connect you with alumnae and organizations that can give you a glimpse at different types of engineering. I would also suggest students meet with faculty. They are a wonderful resource as many of them have worked in the industry.

How and when would one go about applying to programs like Columbia SIPA Five-Year Program or Columbia Law School? One would apply for our joint Five-Year Program with SIPA as a second semester junior. The new Leadership Experience Admission Deferral (LEAD) Fellowship with Columbia Law School was just introduced this year and is available for juniors and seniors. The Law School program is a deferred entry program. Once you apply and are admitted, you then enter 2-3 years post-graduation from Barnard.

Do you have any recommendations as to what we should start doing to build a strong foundation for law school, like classes to take and activities to get involved in?The great thing about law school is that there are no required courses for entry. I would advise you to explore courses of interest to you and develop strong writing skills. The Athena Pre-Law Society is an excellent avenue for interested students. Additionally, we will have Law Week and Graduate School Week on campus October 22-25, 2018.

How difficult would it be to tackle a double major at Barnard while applying for the dual degree program with SIPA?The SIPA program requires that the majority of your courses be completed by the beginning of your senior year. You are permitted to complete your thesis in the senior year while completing the first year requirements for SIPA.

Does Beyond Barnard also help connect us with work study jobs? What's the difference between a federal work study job and non-work study job? Yes, Beyond Barnard does assist with both on- and off-campus jobs, federal work study or not. We are hoping to increase the number of off-campus organizations able to fund through federal work study. The difference between federal work study and other jobs is only the funding source. Employers can hire students with work study and their funds will derive from the federal work study pool.


The 3-2 Program has specific requirements. It’s suggested that you initially tackle your Barnard requirements, and add Physics as your lab science as most of the SEAS programs require Physics. The 3-2 Program requirements can be found here. The 3-2 Program course requirements and their Barnard equivalent courses can be found here. Please consider the Barnard equivalent instead of the CU courses listed. The Barnard courses are smaller, and you will have access to Barnard’s free tutoring program in these courses.


No, you can major in any field you like at Barnard as long as you fulfill the required courses for your SEAS major. Click here to see the different SEAS majors and required courses for the 3-2 program.


Yes, because all major requirements (except the senior thesis) and the 3-2 course requirements must be completed in 3 years, students will take more credits per semester. However, the program can also be done as a 4-2 program - 4 years at Barnard and 2 years at SEAS. The 4-2 program offers more flexibility. Another option is the Express Master’s Program. This would allow you to earn a Master's degree from SEAS with a simplified application process.


The Express Masters is 1.5 - 2 years.


It is often difficult to study abroad with the 3-2 program. However, the 4-2 or Express Master's would give you that option.


Yes, of course! Send an email to BeyondBarnard@barnard.edu and we can connect you with students in the program.


Students should visit us in Beyond Barnard. We can connect you with alumnae and organizations that can give you a glimpse at different types of engineering. I would also suggest students meet with faculty. They are a wonderful resource as many of them have worked in the industry.


One would apply for our joint Five-Year Program with SIPA as a second semester junior. The new Leadership Experience Admission Deferral (LEAD) Fellowship with Columbia Law School was just introduced this year and is available for juniors and seniors. The Law School program is a deferred entry program. Once you apply and are admitted, you then enter 2-3 years post-graduation from Barnard.



The great thing about law school is that there are no required courses for entry. I would advise you to explore courses of interest to you and develop strong writing skills. The Athena Pre-Law Society is an excellent avenue for interested students. Additionally, we will have Law Week and Graduate School Week on campus October 22-25, 2018.


The SIPA program requires that the majority of your courses be completed by the beginning of your senior year. You are permitted to complete your thesis in the senior year while completing the first year requirements for SIPA. Yes, Beyond Barnard does assist with both on- and off-campus jobs, federal work study or not. We are hoping to increase the number of off-campus organizations able to fund through federal work study. The difference between federal work study and other jobs is only the funding source. Employers can hire students with work study and their funds will derive from the federal work study pool.


Campus jobs are at the discretion of the department hiring the student. You can definitely mention that you are a Work Study student in your interview. Beyond Barnard will also host an on-campus job fair within the first two weeks of the start of classes. There are an abundance of on-campus jobs! Also, if you know where you might want to work, it never hurts to send an email of interest to that department. Learn how to write an email here.


Are Barnard babysitting and Barnard Bartending through Beyond Barnard? How can I join these organizations?


You can go to the Barnard Babysitting website and Barnard Bartending website to find out how to join and when trainings and info sessions will be held.









In regards to on campus jobs, is priority given to work study students?


Campus jobs are at the discretion of the department hiring the student. You can definitely mention that you are a Work Study student in your interview. Beyond Barnard will also host an on-campus job fair within the first two weeks of the start of classes. There are an abundance of on-campus jobs! Also, if you know where you might want to work, it never hurts to send an email of interest to that department. Learn how to write an email here.


Are Barnard babysitting and Barnard Bartending through Beyond Barnard? How can I join these organizations?





You can go to the Barnard Babysitting website and Barnard Bartending website to find out how to join and when trainings and info sessions will be held.





Here’s a recap of our What’s Next Wednesday Chat with Dean Nikki Youngblood-Giles, Associate Dean for Beyond Barnard. Look here for answers to questions on the 3-2 program, law school, grad school, work study and jobs, and beyond. If you have any more questions, feel free to email us at first-year@barnard.edu.


Are there are any classes first years are recommended to take for the 3-2 Program with SEAS?


The 3-2 Program has specific requirements. It’s suggested that you initially tackle your Barnard requirements, and add Physics as your lab science as most of the SEAS programs require Physics. The 3-2 Program requirements can be found here. The 3-2 Program course requirements and their Barnard equivalent courses can be found here. Please consider the Barnard equivalent instead of the CU courses listed. The Barnard courses are smaller, and you will have access to Barnard’s free tutoring program in these courses.


Do students going into the 3-2 program always major in a STEM field?


No, you can major in any field you like at Barnard as long as you fulfill the required courses for your SEAS major. Click here to see the different SEAS majors and required courses for the 3-2 program.


Do 3-2 students take more credits per semester compared to other students?


Yes, because all major requirements (except the senior thesis) and the 3-2 course requirements must be completed in 3 years, students will take more credits per semester. However, the program can also be done as a 4-2 program - 4 years at Barnard and 2 years at SEAS. The 4-2 program offers more flexibility. Another option is the Express Master’s Program. This would allow you to earn a Master's degree from SEAS with a simplified application process.


How many years is the Express Masters program?


The Express Masters is 1.5 - 2 years.


Are students who are interested in the 3-2 program able to study abroad?


It is often difficult to study abroad with the 3-2 program. However, the 4-2 or Express Master's would give you that option.


Is there any way we can connect to students in the Combined Plan Program or the MS Express Program to ask them about their experiences?


Yes, of course! Send an email to BeyondBarnard@barnard.edu and we can connect you with students in the program.


Regarding the 3-2 Program with SEAS, what ways are there to explore engineering during one's time at Barnard in order to determine whether the combined plan would be a good choice for you?


Students should visit us in Beyond Barnard. We can connect you with alumnae and organizations that can give you a glimpse at different types of engineering. I would also suggest students meet with faculty. They are a wonderful resource as many of them have worked in the industry.


How and when would one go about applying to programs like Columbia SIPA Five-Year Program or Columbia Law School?


One would apply for our joint Five-Year Program with SIPA as a second semester junior. The new Leadership Experience Admission Deferral (LEAD) Fellowship with Columbia Law School was just introduced this year and is available for juniors and seniors. The Law School program is a deferred entry program. Once you apply and are admitted, you then enter 2-3 years post-graduation from Barnard.


Do you have any recommendations as to what we should start doing to build a strong foundation for law school, like classes to take and activities to get involved in?


The great thing about law school is that there are no required courses for entry. I would advise you to explore courses of interest to you and develop strong writing skills. The Athena Pre-Law Society is an excellent avenue for interested students. Additionally, we will have Law Week and Graduate School Week on campus October 22-25, 2018.


How difficult would it be to tackle a double major at Barnard while applying for the dual degree program with SIPA?


The SIPA program requires that the majority of your courses be completed by the beginning of your senior year. You are permitted to complete your thesis in the senior year while completing the first year requirements for SIPA.


Does Beyond Barnard also help connect us with work study jobs? What's the difference between a federal work study job and non-work study job?



In regards to on campus jobs, is priority given to work study students?


Campus jobs are at the discretion of the department hiring the student. You can definitely mention that you are a Work Study student in your interview. Beyond Barnard will also host an on-campus job fair within the first two weeks of the start of classes. There are an abundance of on-campus jobs! Also, if you know where you might want to work, it never hurts to send an email of interest to that department. Learn how to write an email here.


Are Barnard babysitting and Barnard Bartending through Beyond Barnard? How can I join these organizations?


You can go to the Barnard Babysitting website and Barnard Bartending website to find out how to join and when trainings and info sessions will be held.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

First-Year Experience Course Placement



By now, you should have received an email giving your First-Year Experience placement in either First-Year Writing Workshop, First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations, or First-Year Seminar. If you did not receive your placement email, please email first-year@barnard.edu or call 212-854-2024.

Please look through the course listings in the Columbia Directory of Classes for options. You can also see course descriptions and tentative reading lists for all the courses below on the First-Year Experience website: firstyear.barnard.edu.

(more after the break)


Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Summer Registration Starts MONDAY 7/16/18!


Friendly reminder that summer registration for entering first-year students is next week, July 16-20, 2018.  Don't forget to log into Student Planning via myBarnard at your
scheduled registration time to register for First-Year Experience courses (FY Writing or
FY Seminar, and PE if possible). Recall that, while you can't register for any other classes
at this time, you can -- and should -- plan them, so you can register for FY Experience
courses that don't conflict with your other priorities or commitments.
Scroll back through the FY Guide for more info on course selection, planning, logistics, etc.
There is a lot in here, so some key links:

Registration Videos!! (and written guide)

Psssst! Dont know how to find your registration times? We got you

The Student Side: Questions about Summer Registration

The Student Side: Questions about Course Selection

What’s the deal with First-Year Writing and First-Year Seminar

The Student Side: Info on Placement Tests

Recommended Courses for First-Years by Department



If you don't have your copy of the Academic Guide to Your First Year at Barnard
College 2018-2019, you can also find a pdf here.


If you have more questions, some options:
  • Email first-year@barnard.edu, and one of our summer student assistants or the first-year dean will get back to you.
  • Call the Dean of Studies office at 212-854-2024 during business hours (9-5, Monday-Friday), say you're an entering student with some questions, and you'll be able to talk with one of us.
  • Make an appointment to meet with me via the "Meet the Deans" website: https://www.barnard.edu/dos/academic-advising
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If you encounter technical difficulties while trying to register this
week, please CALL us: 212-854-2024 (faster than emailing!).


Finally, try not to worry!  While your First-Year Writing, Workshop, or Seminar selection
should be relatively fixed by the end of next week, you have plenty of time to continue to
think about the rest -- and you can even change your FYW/FYS if space is available during
future designated periods in summer; it only becomes unchangeable once classes begin on
Sept. 4. Basically, think of this summer registration period as the time to make a really good
first draft of your schedule, and then think of the upcoming add/drop periods as opportunities
to edit this schedule and make it even better for you.

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