Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Guest Blog Post: Thoughts on the Research Apprenticeship Seminar from Jenna Bergmann, '18




There's some exciting additional information about the Research Apprenticeship Seminar! This year, Beyond Barnard is partnering with the class to match each student in the course with a Barnard alumnae to visit and talk with about a career in science and research. Additionally, Beyond Barnard will visit the class throughout the year to offer advising and internship information about careers in science.
Continue reading to learn thoughts on the Research Apprenticeship Seminar from Jenna Bergmann, '18: Personally, I had already done research in high school when I applied for RAS and was excited for the chance to talk about careers in research and working in Barnard labs. I was sure that I wanted to do research in college, but as a pre-med student, I didn't know whether I wanted research to be a part of my career beyond that. I loved the class days when we discussed different careers in science, talked about how to read scientific papers, and learning about the different paths you can take to get there, as well as receiving advice on how to reach out to potential research mentors. Shadowing in Barnard labs was perhaps the most influential experience of the course for me, as I ended up doing research in both of the labs that I shadowed in. It was through working with those mentors that I came to my decision to pursue an MD/PhD and continue with research as a part of my career.


Whenever prospective students ask me about research opportunities for first-years, I am so excited for a chance to talk about the Research Apprenticeship Seminar (RAS). While it's not unheard of for first-years to begin working in labs, RAS is a great chance to get their feet wet in what it means to do research in college and beyond.
Other members of my class, however, really enjoyed the class even if they didn't go on to pursue science as a career or even as a major. Interest in scientific research does not have to mean a career in research, and my RAS class was enriched by Barnard first-years who went on to pursue arts and humanities but still benefited from the class. Discussing science in the news and having debates on topics ranging from vaccination to genome editing allows first-years enrolled in intro science classes to put what their learning in a more relatable context and to understand how scientific research plays a role in society. We also did presentations on scientists of our choosing and on science in the news, allowing me to work on my presentation skills in college in a low-pressure environment. The Research Apprenticeship Seminar gave me a network of fellow Barnard students who were interested in learning about science on several different levels. It broadened my interest in the field of research and the role of science in society, it gave me practical skills for research and other classes, and it gave me the confidence I needed to continue my pursuit of research at Barnard and beyond.

Jenna graduated this past spring with a double major in biology and classics. She currently works as a research technician at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City.

If you're interested in applying for the Research Apprenticeship Seminar:
1.  Log into myBarnard/gBear
2.  Click this link for the Google Form:  https://goo.gl/forms/3qLgfSgEVSokeQY93
3.  Fill out the form, which will ask you for your name and a brief statement of interest (250 words maximum), explaining why you want to take this class and why you think you would be a good candidate for it. The deadline to submit this form is 9 a.m. on Wednesday, July 25.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

FY Writing or FY Seminars full? Try again later today, or tomorrow

Students who may have double-registered for FYS/FYW classes are now dropping extra sections as directed.  Some may be switching among sections their preferences may have changed overnight.

This means that more space is becoming available in these classes, so please check again later today or tomorrow if you weren't able to get into a FYW/FYS class during your registration time yesterday.  

Still can't find one?  Call the First-Year Dean's Office at 212-854-2024.

Monday, July 16, 2018

IMPORTANT: Please drop "extra" sections of FY Seminar or FY Writing ASAP



As a reminder, students may not register for more than one section of FY Seminar or FY Writing. There is simply not enough space to allow this, and it harms your fellow students by making them unable to register for a required course.  

If you are registered for more than one FY Seminar or FY Writing course, please drop all but one as soon as registration reopens at 9:30 a.m. Eastern Time Tuesday morning.  

If you are trying to drop an extra FYS or FYW class and receive an error message, please contact the Registrar ASAP at 212-854-2011.

If you are still registered for multiple sections of FY Seminar or FY Writing at 12 noon on Tuesday, July 17, the registrar will arbitrarily drop all but one from your schedule -- take care of this yourself ASAP if you want to have a choice in this matter.  

Registration Notes: GREEN is GOOD




Several of you have asked how to tell if you have successfully registered:

For First-Year Experience (FY Writing, FY Seminar, Barnard-taught PE) Courses:

If a class appears on your schedule or List of Courses in GREEN, then you have successfully registered for it.





This is true even if it says "This section is full."  Do NOT drop a green section due to concerns about it being full. If the course is GREEN, then you are among the students that is making this class full.  




If a First-Year Experience course that you have attempted to add appears on your schedule or list of courses in RED with a red border on your schedule AND says it is full on your list of courses:




Then this class is full and cannot be added at this time. 
Barnard First-Year Experience Courses do not have waiting lists. If your preferred class is full, you should add another section or a different course instead, but you may check back later to see if space becomes available. 









For all other, non-FY-Experience Courses:
Remember: only FYE courses will be fully registered this week.  
All other courses will remain in the "planned" stage on your record until the Sept. 1-2 registration period for entering first-year students.  




Note:
 the info directly under the course number shows your personal status in the class.  The info under "Meeting Information" is about the class as a whole.  In the example pictured at left: you are planned, and the class has a waitlist.  




Registration Issues (UPDATE)

UPDATE: REGISTRATION IS NOW FIXED. If your registration appointment has passed, you'll be able to log on and register. Registration appointments will continue on as normal for the rest of the day.

We're aware that there's registration issues at the moment. These issues are affecting everyone so no one is able to register. We'll being posting updates here and on the Facebook group about what's going on and next-steps for registration.

Friday, July 13, 2018

Last Minute Registration Reminders



Here are some last minute registration reminders to help Summer Registration on Monday go as smooth as possible!


  • All registration times are listed in Eastern Time
  • You're only registering for a First-Year Writing/First-Year Seminar course on Monday (and a Barnard P.E. course if you want to take P.E. in the fall). You'll register for all other courses during NSOP.
  • If you're planning on taking dance as your P.E. course, you can't register for it until NSOP
  • The 15 credit "Full-Time Billing" course listed on your schedule is a tuition place-holder for billing purposes. Don't worry about it and don't remove it from your schedule!
  • Make sure you have courses planned on your schedule before you register for them!
If you have any problems on Monday during registration, CALL US at 212-854-2024. It's faster than emailing and we can help you quicker.

Teaching Thursday Advising Recap

Here’s a recap of the Teaching Thursday Advising Chat we had today with Professor Lisa Edstrom. For even more information, please check out the Education Program's website, you where you can find even more questions and answers along with additional information about coursework and opportunities. If you have any questions that aren't answered by the Department of Education's website or below, feel free to email us at first-year@barnard.edu or hit up the professor.

Are there any courses that are suggested for first-years to take in the first year?


I recommend taking Education Foundations, Math and the City, Science in the City, Arts & Humanities in the City, as well as Intro to Psychology (no lab required for education) if you are considering Urban Teaching. 


Other recommended courses for first-years and their information can be found here!



It is also recommended that you look at potential tracks to see what courses you need to take, this will help guide your schedule. 


Urban Teaching tracks: 

or the Education Studies track (for a minor or special concentration). 


If you choose to minor in Education Studies, do you start those classes sophomore year? If it is something you aren’t completely sure that you want to do, could you add it on in let’s say your sophomore year or so?

If you choose the Education Studies minor, you can start in the first or second year. 


With all of our minors and the Urban Studies concentration, we recommend Educational Foundations as the first course. It is offered both semesters, and is an ideal course for first years trying to get a sense of what they might want to do. We also encourage you to explore our offerings early on. Take one class in the first year or fall of your sophomore year. That way, you have more time to set up a schedule that really works for you. 

(The Educational Foundations course can fulfill one of the Modes of Thinking requirements -- either Thinking about Social Difference OR Thinking with Historical Perspective, so if you try it out for the possible minor and change your mind, it is still fulfilling a requirement! The "In the City" courses also satisfy Thinking Locally. They are also really fun courses, because you work with kids.)


Is there a way to find out more about the Education Program during the school year after we've taken a class or two? Is there a department meeting we can attend?


Yes. Each semester we hold both an open house and program planning sessions where you can sit down one-on-one with faculty members and map out your own program and get advising specific to you. We post all of our upcoming meetings on our department website. Faculty in the program are very open to meeting with students at any time during the semester. You can access their contact information on their faculty pages (also on the department website), and for some, links to make appointments. 




Do Barnard students need to take some classes at Columbia as well or can everything be done at Barnard?


Barnard's Education Program is a complete education program. We support students who are interested in certification all the way to the end. All coursework is offered through Barnard. 



You can find the complete course listings for the Education Department or the Psychology Department on the Columbia Course Catalog. 


What's Next Wednesday Advising Recap

Here’s a recap of our What’s Next Wednesday Chat with Dean Nikki Youngblood-Giles, Associate Dean for Beyond Barnard. Look here for answers to questions on the 3-2 program, law school, grad school, work study and jobs, and beyond. If you have any more questions, feel free to email us at first-year@barnard.edu.


Are there are any classes first years are recommended to take for the 3-2 Program with SEAS? The 3-2 Program has specific requirements. It’s suggested that you initially tackle your Barnard requirements, and add Physics as your lab science as most of the SEAS programs require Physics. The 3-2 Program requirements can be found here. The 3-2 Program course requirements and their Barnard equivalent courses can be found here. Please consider the Barnard equivalent instead of the CU courses listed. The Barnard courses are smaller, and you will have access to Barnard’s free tutoring program in these courses.

Do students going into the 3-2 program always major in a STEM field? No, you can major in any field you like at Barnard as long as you fulfill the required courses for your SEAS major. Click here to see the different SEAS majors and required courses for the 3-2 program.

Do 3-2 students take more credits per semester compared to other students?Yes, because all major requirements (except the senior thesis) and the 3-2 course requirements must be completed in 3 years, students will take more credits per semester. However, the program can also be done as a 4-2 program - 4 years at Barnard and 2 years at SEAS. The 4-2 program offers more flexibility. Another option is the Express Master’s Program. This would allow you to earn a Master's degree from SEAS with a simplified application process.

How many years is the Express Masters program?The Express Masters is 1.5 - 2 years.

Are students who are interested in the 3-2 program able to study abroad? It is often difficult to study abroad with the 3-2 program. However, the 4-2 or Express Master's would give you that option.

Is there any way we can connect to students in the Combined Plan Program or the MS Express Program to ask them about their experiences?Yes, of course! Send an email to BeyondBarnard@barnard.edu and we can connect you with students in the program.

Regarding the 3-2 Program with SEAS, what ways are there to explore engineering during one's time at Barnard in order to determine whether the combined plan would be a good choice for you?Students should visit us in Beyond Barnard. We can connect you with alumnae and organizations that can give you a glimpse at different types of engineering. I would also suggest students meet with faculty. They are a wonderful resource as many of them have worked in the industry.

How and when would one go about applying to programs like Columbia SIPA Five-Year Program or Columbia Law School? One would apply for our joint Five-Year Program with SIPA as a second semester junior. The new Leadership Experience Admission Deferral (LEAD) Fellowship with Columbia Law School was just introduced this year and is available for juniors and seniors. The Law School program is a deferred entry program. Once you apply and are admitted, you then enter 2-3 years post-graduation from Barnard.

Do you have any recommendations as to what we should start doing to build a strong foundation for law school, like classes to take and activities to get involved in?The great thing about law school is that there are no required courses for entry. I would advise you to explore courses of interest to you and develop strong writing skills. The Athena Pre-Law Society is an excellent avenue for interested students. Additionally, we will have Law Week and Graduate School Week on campus October 22-25, 2018.

How difficult would it be to tackle a double major at Barnard while applying for the dual degree program with SIPA?The SIPA program requires that the majority of your courses be completed by the beginning of your senior year. You are permitted to complete your thesis in the senior year while completing the first year requirements for SIPA.

Does Beyond Barnard also help connect us with work study jobs? What's the difference between a federal work study job and non-work study job? Yes, Beyond Barnard does assist with both on- and off-campus jobs, federal work study or not. We are hoping to increase the number of off-campus organizations able to fund through federal work study. The difference between federal work study and other jobs is only the funding source. Employers can hire students with work study and their funds will derive from the federal work study pool.


The 3-2 Program has specific requirements. It’s suggested that you initially tackle your Barnard requirements, and add Physics as your lab science as most of the SEAS programs require Physics. The 3-2 Program requirements can be found here. The 3-2 Program course requirements and their Barnard equivalent courses can be found here. Please consider the Barnard equivalent instead of the CU courses listed. The Barnard courses are smaller, and you will have access to Barnard’s free tutoring program in these courses.


No, you can major in any field you like at Barnard as long as you fulfill the required courses for your SEAS major. Click here to see the different SEAS majors and required courses for the 3-2 program.


Yes, because all major requirements (except the senior thesis) and the 3-2 course requirements must be completed in 3 years, students will take more credits per semester. However, the program can also be done as a 4-2 program - 4 years at Barnard and 2 years at SEAS. The 4-2 program offers more flexibility. Another option is the Express Master’s Program. This would allow you to earn a Master's degree from SEAS with a simplified application process.


The Express Masters is 1.5 - 2 years.


It is often difficult to study abroad with the 3-2 program. However, the 4-2 or Express Master's would give you that option.


Yes, of course! Send an email to BeyondBarnard@barnard.edu and we can connect you with students in the program.


Students should visit us in Beyond Barnard. We can connect you with alumnae and organizations that can give you a glimpse at different types of engineering. I would also suggest students meet with faculty. They are a wonderful resource as many of them have worked in the industry.


One would apply for our joint Five-Year Program with SIPA as a second semester junior. The new Leadership Experience Admission Deferral (LEAD) Fellowship with Columbia Law School was just introduced this year and is available for juniors and seniors. The Law School program is a deferred entry program. Once you apply and are admitted, you then enter 2-3 years post-graduation from Barnard.



The great thing about law school is that there are no required courses for entry. I would advise you to explore courses of interest to you and develop strong writing skills. The Athena Pre-Law Society is an excellent avenue for interested students. Additionally, we will have Law Week and Graduate School Week on campus October 22-25, 2018.


The SIPA program requires that the majority of your courses be completed by the beginning of your senior year. You are permitted to complete your thesis in the senior year while completing the first year requirements for SIPA. Yes, Beyond Barnard does assist with both on- and off-campus jobs, federal work study or not. We are hoping to increase the number of off-campus organizations able to fund through federal work study. The difference between federal work study and other jobs is only the funding source. Employers can hire students with work study and their funds will derive from the federal work study pool.


Campus jobs are at the discretion of the department hiring the student. You can definitely mention that you are a Work Study student in your interview. Beyond Barnard will also host an on-campus job fair within the first two weeks of the start of classes. There are an abundance of on-campus jobs! Also, if you know where you might want to work, it never hurts to send an email of interest to that department. Learn how to write an email here.


Are Barnard babysitting and Barnard Bartending through Beyond Barnard? How can I join these organizations?


You can go to the Barnard Babysitting website and Barnard Bartending website to find out how to join and when trainings and info sessions will be held.









In regards to on campus jobs, is priority given to work study students?


Campus jobs are at the discretion of the department hiring the student. You can definitely mention that you are a Work Study student in your interview. Beyond Barnard will also host an on-campus job fair within the first two weeks of the start of classes. There are an abundance of on-campus jobs! Also, if you know where you might want to work, it never hurts to send an email of interest to that department. Learn how to write an email here.


Are Barnard babysitting and Barnard Bartending through Beyond Barnard? How can I join these organizations?





You can go to the Barnard Babysitting website and Barnard Bartending website to find out how to join and when trainings and info sessions will be held.





Here’s a recap of our What’s Next Wednesday Chat with Dean Nikki Youngblood-Giles, Associate Dean for Beyond Barnard. Look here for answers to questions on the 3-2 program, law school, grad school, work study and jobs, and beyond. If you have any more questions, feel free to email us at first-year@barnard.edu.


Are there are any classes first years are recommended to take for the 3-2 Program with SEAS?


The 3-2 Program has specific requirements. It’s suggested that you initially tackle your Barnard requirements, and add Physics as your lab science as most of the SEAS programs require Physics. The 3-2 Program requirements can be found here. The 3-2 Program course requirements and their Barnard equivalent courses can be found here. Please consider the Barnard equivalent instead of the CU courses listed. The Barnard courses are smaller, and you will have access to Barnard’s free tutoring program in these courses.


Do students going into the 3-2 program always major in a STEM field?


No, you can major in any field you like at Barnard as long as you fulfill the required courses for your SEAS major. Click here to see the different SEAS majors and required courses for the 3-2 program.


Do 3-2 students take more credits per semester compared to other students?


Yes, because all major requirements (except the senior thesis) and the 3-2 course requirements must be completed in 3 years, students will take more credits per semester. However, the program can also be done as a 4-2 program - 4 years at Barnard and 2 years at SEAS. The 4-2 program offers more flexibility. Another option is the Express Master’s Program. This would allow you to earn a Master's degree from SEAS with a simplified application process.


How many years is the Express Masters program?


The Express Masters is 1.5 - 2 years.


Are students who are interested in the 3-2 program able to study abroad?


It is often difficult to study abroad with the 3-2 program. However, the 4-2 or Express Master's would give you that option.


Is there any way we can connect to students in the Combined Plan Program or the MS Express Program to ask them about their experiences?


Yes, of course! Send an email to BeyondBarnard@barnard.edu and we can connect you with students in the program.


Regarding the 3-2 Program with SEAS, what ways are there to explore engineering during one's time at Barnard in order to determine whether the combined plan would be a good choice for you?


Students should visit us in Beyond Barnard. We can connect you with alumnae and organizations that can give you a glimpse at different types of engineering. I would also suggest students meet with faculty. They are a wonderful resource as many of them have worked in the industry.


How and when would one go about applying to programs like Columbia SIPA Five-Year Program or Columbia Law School?


One would apply for our joint Five-Year Program with SIPA as a second semester junior. The new Leadership Experience Admission Deferral (LEAD) Fellowship with Columbia Law School was just introduced this year and is available for juniors and seniors. The Law School program is a deferred entry program. Once you apply and are admitted, you then enter 2-3 years post-graduation from Barnard.


Do you have any recommendations as to what we should start doing to build a strong foundation for law school, like classes to take and activities to get involved in?


The great thing about law school is that there are no required courses for entry. I would advise you to explore courses of interest to you and develop strong writing skills. The Athena Pre-Law Society is an excellent avenue for interested students. Additionally, we will have Law Week and Graduate School Week on campus October 22-25, 2018.


How difficult would it be to tackle a double major at Barnard while applying for the dual degree program with SIPA?


The SIPA program requires that the majority of your courses be completed by the beginning of your senior year. You are permitted to complete your thesis in the senior year while completing the first year requirements for SIPA.


Does Beyond Barnard also help connect us with work study jobs? What's the difference between a federal work study job and non-work study job?



In regards to on campus jobs, is priority given to work study students?


Campus jobs are at the discretion of the department hiring the student. You can definitely mention that you are a Work Study student in your interview. Beyond Barnard will also host an on-campus job fair within the first two weeks of the start of classes. There are an abundance of on-campus jobs! Also, if you know where you might want to work, it never hurts to send an email of interest to that department. Learn how to write an email here.


Are Barnard babysitting and Barnard Bartending through Beyond Barnard? How can I join these organizations?


You can go to the Barnard Babysitting website and Barnard Bartending website to find out how to join and when trainings and info sessions will be held.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

First-Year Experience Course Placement



By now, you should have received an email giving your First-Year Experience placement in either First-Year Writing Workshop, First-Year Writing: Critical Conversations, or First-Year Seminar. If you did not receive your placement email, please email first-year@barnard.edu or call 212-854-2024.

Please look through the course listings in the Columbia Directory of Classes for options. You can also see course descriptions and tentative reading lists for all the courses below on the First-Year Experience website: firstyear.barnard.edu.

(more after the break)


Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Summer Registration Starts MONDAY 7/16/18!


Friendly reminder that summer registration for entering first-year students is next week, July 16-20, 2018.  Don't forget to log into Student Planning via myBarnard at your
scheduled registration time to register for First-Year Experience courses (FY Writing or
FY Seminar, and PE if possible). Recall that, while you can't register for any other classes
at this time, you can -- and should -- plan them, so you can register for FY Experience
courses that don't conflict with your other priorities or commitments.
Scroll back through the FY Guide for more info on course selection, planning, logistics, etc.
There is a lot in here, so some key links:

Registration Videos!! (and written guide)

Psssst! Dont know how to find your registration times? We got you

The Student Side: Questions about Summer Registration

The Student Side: Questions about Course Selection

What’s the deal with First-Year Writing and First-Year Seminar

The Student Side: Info on Placement Tests

Recommended Courses for First-Years by Department



If you don't have your copy of the Academic Guide to Your First Year at Barnard
College 2018-2019, you can also find a pdf here.


If you have more questions, some options:
  • Email first-year@barnard.edu, and one of our summer student assistants or the first-year dean will get back to you.
  • Call the Dean of Studies office at 212-854-2024 during business hours (9-5, Monday-Friday), say you're an entering student with some questions, and you'll be able to talk with one of us.
  • Make an appointment to meet with me via the "Meet the Deans" website: https://www.barnard.edu/dos/academic-advising
Image result for we can help gif


If you encounter technical difficulties while trying to register this
week, please CALL us: 212-854-2024 (faster than emailing!).


Finally, try not to worry!  While your First-Year Writing, Workshop, or Seminar selection
should be relatively fixed by the end of next week, you have plenty of time to continue to
think about the rest -- and you can even change your FYW/FYS if space is available during
future designated periods in summer; it only becomes unchangeable once classes begin on
Sept. 4. Basically, think of this summer registration period as the time to make a really good
first draft of your schedule, and then think of the upcoming add/drop periods as opportunities
to edit this schedule and make it even better for you.

Image result for we can help gif

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Pre-Med Monday Advising Recap

Here’s a recap of the Pre-Health Advising Chat we had yesterday with Dean Melinda Cohen. For even more information, please check out the FAQs on the Beyond Barnard Pre-Health website. There, you will find even more questions and answers along with additional information about pre-health coursework and opportunities. If you have any questions that aren't answered by the Beyond Barnard website or below, feel free to email us at first-year@barnard.edu.


Are there any courses that are suggested for first-years to take if they want to complete the pre-med track?
During the first semester at Barnard, a pre-med student's academic program will likely include:
  • a First-Year Experience course
  • an introductory science course with laboratory
  • a math or statistics course
  • a fourth course of the student's choosing
Note: It is not required to take a math or statistics course in your first semester. We encourage students to take math in the first year to meet the math prerequisite for physics at Barnard. It is not necessary to take it in your first semester, but many students chose to.


Is there a general recommendation to which science we should take first?

Can first-year students begin taking the chemistry sequence their first year?
About 50% of our incoming first-year pre-health students take chemistry in their first year. Many are successful in the course. I encourage you to refer to here for more information about beginning with chemistry and if this track is right for you. Here's the Chemistry’s Department website on recommended courses for first-years.
If you feel comfortable with Chemistry, there are benefits to beginning the sequence in your first year. Because it is a 4-course sequence, it has less flexibility than the other subjects and can't be taken out of order (unlike Biology or Physics). Thus, if you wish to study abroad and/or free up your junior and senior year, it can be very beneficial to start with Chemistry.
That being said, many students begin with Biology and find this to be the right path for them.
(more after the break)


The Student Side: How to Communicate with Others (via Email and Phone)

So you have a question that you can’t Google to answer for. What to do? It’s time to contact a real human being and ask for help. But wait, you’re not on campus or you don’t want to leave your bed. Don’t worry! You can still ask via ~email~ or with a ~phone call~.




But how do you properly ask someone a question via phone or email? How do you write an email that’s effective, short, yet still polite and respectful? How do you make a phone call when you have no idea who will pick up? We’re here to help. As people who have written a few emails in our day and have made more than 5 phone calls, here are some tips and tricks:


Emails
The most indirect, direct form of contact that leaves an electronic paper trail. Here’s how to write an effective and short email.

(more after the break)

Monday, July 9, 2018

Opportunity: Apply to join Research Apprenticeship Seminar (enrichment course) -- Deadline Wed 7/25, 9 AM


Are you interested in science research? Then consider applying for The Research Apprenticeship Seminar. This year-long seminar is offered under the auspices of the Hughes Science Pipeline Project (HSPP), a science curriculum and undergraduate research program funded by grants from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

The seminar is open to 16 first-year students who are also enrolled in an introductory lab science sequence. The course will meet in a seminar format on Tuesdays from 2-4 p.m., and will discuss how research problems are defined, how scientists immerse themselves in the existing literature on a topic, how researchers craft experimental protocols and collect data, and how data can be used to test hypotheses. Students will also consider science stories in the New York Times and conduct formal debates about ethical and social issues, such as the use of animal subjects in research. Occasionally, the seminar period will be devoted to tours of faculty science labs to learn about the research that Barnard professors conduct and the research opportunities available on campus. Students will also attend several events, including Barnard’s annual Distinguished Women in Science Lecture and the HSPP Student Research Symposium.

Additionally, students will participate in a month-long laboratory rotation each semester. During the rotation period, each student will spend 3 hours per week shadowing a Barnard junior or senior Research Intern who is conducting a year-long research project sponsored by the HSPP. In addition to this exposure to research at Barnard, students will discuss how to obtain summer science internships in laboratories off campus. Seminar assignments will include readings about the research process, as well as short library-based research projects about scientific claims in textbooks. In the fall semester, students will develop their presentation skills in a session with Barnard’s Speaking Fellows. In the spring semester, each student will deliver an oral presentation about the research career of a scientist of her choosing. Students will also maintain a weekly "blog" that describes their reactions to readings, the results of their library research projects, and their reflections on laboratory rotations and events attended. The seminar will require no formal written assignments, and there will be no exams.

The Research Apprenticeship Seminar is a yearlong course that carries a total of 3.0 points of academic credit (1.5 points each semester).* A catalogue description follows:
HSPP BC1001x-1002y. Research Apprenticeship Seminar. Introduction to research in the natural sciences. Students will participate in seminar discussions about the research process, tour laboratories, and complete two rotations in the labs of Barnard faculty mentors, shadowing undergraduate Research Interns who are conducting research. Instructor: Elizabeth P Bauer (Department of Biological Sciences)

To apply to participate in the seminar:
1.  Log into myBarnard/gBear

2.  Click this link for the Google Form:  https://goo.gl/forms/3qLgfSgEVSokeQY93
3.  Fill out the form, which will ask you for your name and a brief statement of interest (250 words maximum), explaining why you want to take this class and why you think you would be a good candidate for it. The deadline to submit this form is 9 a.m. on Wednesday, July 25.

If you are admitted to the course, you will receive an email with further instructions about how to sign up for it.

*Note that students admitted to this class are required to take both semesters.

Advice from a science prof for students interested in science & health professions


A message for first-year students interested in science and health professions:

Dear First-Years,

Allow me to join the chorus of excited faculty and staff and welcome you to Barnard College! As way of introduction, my name is Dr. Jacob Alexander, and I am the Director of the General Chemistry Laboratory and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemistry. Over the years, I have done quite a bit of work with students interested in science (not just in chemistry!) and many of these were students interested in exploring a track which prepares them for one of the pre-health professions. This is the subject Dean Grabiner asked me to write about today, and I am happy to do so.

There are many possible paths for students interested in the pre-health professions, but for a First-Year student let’s focus on what to do immediately.

(more after the break)

Tuesday, July 3, 2018

The Student Side: Questions about Course Selection

Before you register for classes, you need to know which classes you want to take. And guess who decides what classes you take? YOU.


Let’s go over some of your most asked questions about selecting courses.


Where can I find courses?
A seemingly basic, but very important question. There’s many different places to find courses. Hit up the Columbia Directory of Classes. Surf through the Barnard Course Catalog. Department websites are another great place if you’re interested in a specific major.


I feel like I have no idea what I'm doing; do you have any recommendations as far as what classes to take first semester?
Besides FYW, FYS, and PE, all other classes you take are up to you. When it comes to taking classes, you have a TON of options, which can be both exciting and a little overwhelming. If you’re interested in a certain major, take an intro class to see if you like it. Take a class just because it sounds really interesting. Start on that language requirement if you know you want to do a really immersive study abroad program.


(more after the break)